All posts by Zia

Hi! My name is [Zia] and this is my blog. It covers my adventures in eating, cooking, hiking, daytripping, and doing stuff in New Mexico. I'm a writer/editor born and raised in New Mexico. After a decade-long stint farther west, I'm back in the Land of Enchantment. Truth be told, I'm mostly here for the food. But I'm also really into the people, the panoramic views, the mountains, the deserts, the culture, and the seasons. Oh and the food.

Green Chile Chicken Cheese Enchilada Pot Pie… in cast iron

INGREDIENTS
  • 4 Tbsp butter or EVOO
  • 1 rib celery, diced
  • 1 small yellow or white onion, diced
  • 2-3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • ¼ cup half & half
  • 2 cups chopped rotisserie chicken
  • 1/2 cup roasted green chile, chopped (or more)
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar + 1/4 cup shredded cheddar
  • 2 pie crusts; I use pilsbury refrigerated ready-made pie crusts
  • 1 egg, beaten, for egg wash
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Brush bottom & sides of cast iron skillet with vegetable oil.
  2. In a large skillet, melt the butter or heat EVOO over medium-high heat. Cook the celery, onion, and garlic until they begin to soften
  3. Lower heat to medium. Stir constantly while adding flour. Stir until flour is absorbed and lightly toasted in color.
  4. Gradually stir in chicken broth while whisking to incorporate flour. Bring to a boil then lower to a simmer. Add half and half and stir to combine.
  5. After 3-4 minutes, remove from heat and stir in chopped chicken and green chile.
  6. Unroll one pie crust and place in bottom of the skillet, then pour in the filling.
  7. Spread 1 cup shredded cheddar on top of filling.
  8. Unroll the second crust on top. Seal crusts together by pinching together or pressing with a fork.
  9. Cut vents into the top crust then brush with egg wash. Sprinkle top with remaining 1/4 cup cheddar cheese.
  10. Bake for 50-55 minutes until crust is golden.

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San Marcos Cafe & Feed Store — San Marcos, NM

This adorable little café is one of those places that you’ll miss if you aren’t looking for it. And you might miss it even if you are looking for it. It’s located just off the road along Hwy 14, about 7 miles south of the intersection of I-25 and Hwy 14 near Santa Fe. It is open daily for breakfast and lunch.

The grounds of the café are unique to say the least. Peacocks and turkeys and chickens roam free (or semi-free; there’s a fence), and behind the building are several aviaries for turkeys, doves, and other birds. You might also catch a peek of what we call the “Lady GaGa Chicken” which is pretty much a chicken in a really fluffy feather suit.

San Marcos Café and Feed Store - San Marcos, New Mexico
San Marcos Café and Feed Store – San Marcos, New Mexico

The inside of the café is just as charming, with uniquely painted and crafted wooden tables and chairs, and a cozy fire in the fireplace (this day, at least).

San Marcos dining area
San Marcos dining area

Cups of coffee all around and cinnamon rolls for everyone. That’s how we wanted to start this trip.

The cinnamon rolls are flaky and sweet and delicious — everything a good cinnamon roll should be. The coffee is tasty. This is a great duo to start off a weekend getaway.

Overall, we have fully enjoyed our stops at San Marcos both times we’ve been so far. Hopefully we’ll get to stop by again soon for a full meal, because their menu looks pretty amazing (burritos, green chile stew, huevos rancheros, and other NM staples).

SAN MARCOS CAFE

3877 State Rd 14
Santa Fe, NM 87508
(505) 471-9298

(a few miles south of Santa Fe on Hwy 14, west side of the road)

Open daily 8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

 

 

EatingNewMexico Cookbook Now Available!

The first Eating New Mexico cookbook is available for sale at blurb.com!!

This cookbook includes new and handed-down recipes for family favorites including biscochitos, green chile cheddar apple pie, pinon applesauce ice cream, and much more.

http://www.blurb.com/ebooks/510149-eating-new-mexico

(This is an e-book, compatible with kindle, ipad, etc.)

I’m in the process of getting it listed on Apple iBooks as well, and will post an update when I get that done.

Biscochitos

Bizcochitos, Biscochos, whatever you call them and however you spell them, they are a New Mexico staple around Christmas time.

Here’s my current recipe. It makes 4-5 dozen, depending how big you cut em and how good you are at rerolling the scraps etc.

Anise seed
Anise seed — the more the merrier
  • 6 cups flour
  • 3 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 pound lard (lard is a MUST, do not substitute)
  • 1.5 cups sugar
  • 4-6 Tbsp Anise seed
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup liquid, dealer’s choice: whiskey, brandy, sweet wine, orange juice, apple juice. For my batch, I used 1/4 cup whiskey and 1/4 cup orange juice.
  • 1/2 cup sugar + 2 Tbsp cinnamon (for dusting after cooked)

Directions:

  1. Sift together flour, baking soda, and salt.
  2. Cream lard with sugar and anise seed on medium.
  3. In a medium bowl, beat eggs until light and fluffy.
  4. Add eggs to creamed sugar/lard mixture and mix until combined.
  5. Add liquid of choice.
  6. Slowly add flour about 1/2 cup at a time and mix until a stiff dough has formed. You might not need all of the flour.
  7. Remove dough, wrap, and refrigerate overnight (or a few hours).
  8. Preheat oven to 350 deg.
  9. Let dough stand 15-20 minutes or until soft enough to roll.
  10. Roll out dough to approx. 1/8 inch (they will be thick). Cut with cookie cutter and place on cookie sheet.
  11. Bake 10-12 minutes or until bottom turns a golden brown.
  12. Mix cinnamon and sugar in a bowl.
  13. As cookies come out of the oven (and after cooling about 5 minutes), drop top-down in cinnamon/sugar mixture then set aside to cool further.

 

Biscochitos
Biscochitos for Christmas!

 

The High Road – Enchanted Weekend Part 3

The High Road

The High Road is a NM Scenic Byway that connects Santa Fe and Taos. A little over 50 miles of roadway winds along through the Sangre de Cristo mountains through small towns, land grants, pueblos, and villages. (The Low Road, by comparison, connects Santa Fe and Taos via the valleys along the Rio Grande.)

The High Road begins in Pojoaque, then passes through the towns of Nambe, Chimayó, Córdova, Truchas, Ojo Sarco, Las Trampas, Peñasco, Vadito, Sipapu, and finally Taos.

Along the way are no less than 50 small galleries and shops displaying the art of local artists. Our intention was to stop at several galleries along the way, but we found that many were closed (or just seemed empty) on the day we were driving through.

One place we did stop and browse was the High Road Marketplace in Truchas. This shop displays the art of many artists in a variety of media — paintings, ironwork, gourds, etc.

The High Road Marketplace in Truchas, NM
The High Road Marketplace in Truchas, NM

We then visited the gallery of painter Charlee Newman in Ojo Sarco. Her oil landscapes and pastels of wildlife were stunning and we all left there wishing we could afford to take a few home with us. Also, the gallery was on her private property, and we were shown around by Ms. Newman herself. In true EatingNewMexico style, we all noted that whatever she was cooking up for dinner smelled REALLY GOOD.

Charlee Newman's gallery property -- fall
Charlee Newman’s gallery property — fall

Smelling whatever was roasting on the Newman property got us all pretty hungry. So we checked our maps and decided to stop and eat in or near Peñasco. According to Yelp, a little place called Alicia’s Café was nearby and open at the right time and claimed to serve New Mexican food. So we aimed ourselves at it, in hopes of some Enchiladas with Red. You know how it is when you just NEED some red. That’s where we all were.

So, all the map apps LIE.

After being sent way out of the way by both Apple Maps and Google Maps about 4 times (with a loss of about 30 minutes), we were all starving and ready to get our grub on. We searched and searched. We were ready to give up. We pulled into a parking lot to make a final U-turn and just get the heck out of dodge and try our luck in another town.

HARK! An old building with a kind of skeezy sign out front reading: New Mexican Food. I honestly don’t remember the name of the restaurant or really much about it other than that we walked in and all said, “Nope.” Meaning, let’s just tend to our blood sugar then get out of here. There was something off about the feng shui or something, but we all knew immediately we didn’t want to spend a whole lot of time there. We ordered chips and salsa (very yummy) and chile-cheese fries to share around the table. The waitress informed us that the restaurant actually used to be Alicia’s, which we had been looking for all along. Ah, evil irony.

We didn’t take any pictures of anything to write a real review, which is unfortunate because the red chile on the fries was SUPER good.

We finished up quick and got back on the road. I think we all would have liked to have spent a little more time on The High Road, meandering along, walking through galleries. I think the best bet here would be to take one of the organized tours (offered here via High Road Artisans) to ensure the most galleries will be open, and that you won’t be the only person walking through someone’s home/gallery, looking through at their stuff.

Next stop: TAOS.

El Santuario de Chimayó — Enchanted Weekend Trip Part 2

On to Chimayo

This is part 2 in an 8 (or so) part series about our weekend trip from Albuquerque up to Red River and back. Find part 1 here.

We passed right on through Santa Fe with nary a foot stepped on the Plaza nor a breakfast burrito in our guts and headed north on Hwy 84 to state road 503.

FUN MAP FACT: When looking at a map, you can tell the difference between a US Highway and a State Road by the shape of their number designator. US numbered highways are marked with a shield shape with the number inside. State Roads are marked with a circle and the number inside. 

For some great New Mexico road maps (including a map of State Roads, one of Scenic Byways, and one of rest stops), visit the NM DoT:  NM Dept of Transportation Maps.

After turning east on road 503, we passed through the small town of Nambé. The town combined with Nambé Pueblo has a population of around 2,000 people. A nearby mill produces the eight-metal alloy used to create Nambé housewares such as THESE BEAUTIES. But they are actually made elsewhere. Like, China-elsewhere.

About 12 miles up the road (503), we came to Santuario de Chimayó.

 

Chimayo Courtyard entryway
The oft-photographed & painted entryway to the Santuario de Chimayo courtyard.

The church at Chimayó is known for many things. The original chapel on the site was built around 1810 and was then upgraded to the larger church (which stands today, and BTW is still pretty small) a few years later. So, it’s pretty old, is what I’m saying. During the Easter season, the roads from nearby towns to Chimayó are crowded with walkers. Not the Walking Dead kind of walkers, rather those devout souls making the pilgrimage (walking or even on hands and knees) to this holy place from locations all over northern NM. There is a ton of history here, which you can read about at their website: Santuario de Chimayo Website  (but be forewarned it autoplays music).

Toward the rear of the church, a tiny room with a slanting floor and low ceiling holds what tens of thousands of people come here for each year: El Pocito — the healing dirt of Chimayó. Believed to have healing powers, the dirt is dug from a small hole in the clay floor. Visitors either rub the dirt on a hurting or problem area (a bum knee, say), bag a teaspoon up to keep with them, or in some cases (I’ve read) ingest it. Team EatingNewMexico opted to save our stomach space for chips & salsa and just rubbed a small amount of the dirt on our hands.

Beyond El Pocito you pass through a prayer room, lined with photos, testimonials, and discarded crutches (by those allegedly healed by the soil).

PROS:  The church is beautiful and has major historical significance in New Mexico. The grounds are lovely. It is a spiritual place sure to have an impact on people of any faith.

The grounds at Santuario de Chimayo
The grounds at Santuario de Chimayo
The grounds at Santuario de Chimayo
The grounds at Santuario de Chimayo

CONS: Now, I remember visiting Chimayó maybe 15-18 years ago, and I remember there only being the church, kind of hard to find, with a small dirt parking lot in front and one across the road. Now, there is a gift shop, a café, and other things that just make it feel kind of commercial. It was pretty sad/annoying to walk up the hill to the church from the parking lot (which is now down the hill behind the church) and see a big plywood SLUSH PUPPIE sign in front of the café. Talk about tacky. It has just lost some of its mystery and charm, is all.

But it is still WELL WORTH the visit. We hung around the Santuario de Chimayo for about an hour total, then got back in our cars to continue on our journey up along The High Road to Taos.

 

The Turquoise Trail – Enchanted Weekend Part 1

Hello! This post is part 1 of a (so far) 8-part series dedicated to a weekend trip we recently took around northern NM. Check back soon for the following 7 (or so) parts.

In northern New Mexico, highways and byways have names, not numbers. Well, they have numbers too, but their names are much cooler. A few weeks ago, team EatingNewMexico took off on a whirlwind weekend jaunt around north-central New Mexico. Instead of using interstates and bigger roadways, we opted for back roads and scenic byways: The Turquoise Trail, The High Road, and The Enchanted Circle.

We hit a bunch of historic and special little towns along the way, and of course ate a lot, because that’s how we roll. We were extremely wise/lucky to plan our trip for mid-October, just as the trees along the rivers and on the mountainsides were their brightest yellow and orange.

The Turquoise Trail

The Turquoise Trail is where our journey began. It is a National Scenic Byway (turquoisetrail.org) that spans about 50 miles along Highway 14 from Tijeras to Santa Fe. (Once it hits Santa Fe, it turns into Cerillos Road.) The Turquoise Trail runs through the towns of Tijeras, Cedar Crest, Sandia Park, Golden, Madrid, Cerillos, and San Marcos.

Worth a stop nearly every time we go through is the small town of Madrid. Madrid (pronounced like “MAD-rid” not “muh-DRID” like you might think) was an old mining town turned ghost town that was then revitalized in the 60s and is now a small but thriving artists’ community. There is a cool little dusty museum there, galleries and shops to walk through, and the Mine Shaft Tavern, where you can get a green chile cheeseburger (and probably some other stuff). Madrid is also where parts of the John Travolta movie Wild Hogs was filmed.

Alas, on this trip, we had much to do and not much time, so we didn’t stop in Madrid. Just blew right through (at the prescribed 20 mph).

Our first stop on this trip was San Marcos, at the San Marcos Café and Feed Store. (visit on Yelp)

San Marcos Café and Feed Store

This adorable little café is one of those places that you’ll miss if you aren’t looking for it. And you might miss it even if you are looking for it. It’s located just off the road along Hwy 14, about 7 miles south of the intersection of I-25 and Hwy 14 near Santa Fe. It is open daily for breakfast and lunch.

The grounds of the café are unique to say the least. Peacocks and turkeys and chickens roam free, and behind the building are several aviaries for turkeys, doves, and other birds. You might also catch a peek of what we call the “Lady GaGa Chicken” which is pretty much a chicken in a really fluffy feather suit.

San Marcos Café and Feed Store - San Marcos, New Mexico
San Marcos Café and Feed Store – San Marcos, New Mexico

The inside of the café is just as charming, with uniquely painted and crafted wooden tables and chairs, and a cozy fire in the fireplace (this day, at least).

San Marcos dining area
San Marcos dining area

The wait staff is friendly and welcoming, and somehow remembered that our group of 5 likes cinnamon rolls, even though this was only our second visit. Cups of coffee all around and cinnamon rolls for everyone. That’s how we wanted to start this trip.

The cinnamon rolls are flaky and sweet and delicious — everything a good cinnamon roll should be. The coffee is tasty. This is a great duo to start off a weekend getaway.

Overall, we have fully enjoyed our stops at San Marcos both times we’ve been so far. I’m sure we will be back soon and often!

Santa Fe

Next up, we headed into Santa Fe to drop our doggie off at the doggie hotel. The Z Pet Hotel, to be precise. This is a little doggie hotel right off of Cerillos where you can board your pets and even get them groomed on their last day there. We have been very happy with Z Pet Hotel. They have easy reservations, easy drop offs, easy pickups, and the dogs seem happy there. Prices are reasonable and the employees are nice! Check them out here: Z Pet Hotel

PART 2

Check out Part 2 of our journey — Chimayo — here.

New Mexico’s “Musical Highway” Plays America the Beautiful

A small stretch of road along old Route 66 / Hwy 333 near Tijeras, NM has been enabled with a musical ability. If you drive over a special rumble strip at exactly 45 miles per hour (no, not 40, not 50), you will be serenaded with a slightly asphalty rendition of the last few bars of America the Beautiful.

HOW TO GET THERE: From Albuquerque, at the Tramway/Central intersection, either hop on I-40 then exit to Rte 66 at Carnuel, or just get on Rte 66 right there at Tramway/Central and take it the whole way. Either way, after Rte 66 passes under I-40 (east of Carnuel), get ready and start looking for the blue signs. There is a sign reading “Musical Highway” that prepares you, then a sign reading “Reduce Speed to 45 mph” to get you in the proper speed zone. Arrows painted on the rumble strips show you where to actually place your tires. Note: The musical section is on the eastbound lane only.

If you watch the video above, you’ll see a second, shorter rumble strip after the first one. The first time I drove the Musical Highway, that second rumble strip played the Nationwide jingle. I kid you not. It was terrible and I felt somehow violated. But the second time I drove it (in the video above), the second rumble strip had been…. de-activated. THANK GOODNESS.

Rumor has it that the Musical Highway was created here as part of a Discovery Channel experiment in crowd control for a show to air soon, with the added benefit of getting drivers to slow to the speed limit, at least for a little while. In my experience (ahem), drivers just speed back up when the music stops. But at least we are being safe for a little while.

UPDATE: We indeed saw the episode of Crowd Control that featured the NM Musical Highway. Pretty cool, and I was happy to see that the jingle was included for the episode only. Plus, Crowd Control has become one of our favorite shows.

Drool-worthy Green Chile Cheeseburger & Tacos & Everything Else at Burger Boy

One day you might find yourself on NM HWY 14, cruising up or down the Turquoise Trail National Scenic Byway. This byway is basically the “back road” linking Albuquerque and Santa Fe, taking you along the east side of the Sandia Mountains from Tijeras to Santa Fe. Along the way, you’ll pass through some beautiful country and through the historic mining (now eclectic arts & crafts) towns of Madrid, Cerillos, and Golden. This makes for a lovely day trip from the ABQ or SF areas, stopping at each little town along the way, learning their history, viewing their art, and drinking their coffee. Oh, and eating their burgers, though this goes without saying.

Heading north from Tijeras to Santa Fe, the first town you’ll hit is Cedar Crest, just a few miles north of I-40 on Hwy 14.

Tucked into the few buildings and brush on the west side of the road is where you’ll find Burger Boy. It’s a family owned and run business that has been slinging burgers in the East Mountains for more than 28 years. The ambiance is “diner casual” — just this side of a greasy spoon — but clean enough and very comfortable. The walls are adorned with paintings and news clippings and photos for your perusal while you wait for your food. Service is quick and friendly, and your drink will always be refilled. (You can just take your cup to the counter and ask for more if you’re in a hurry.)

Burger Boy is pretty much our favorite place to eat on the East Mountains, when we want to be bad (but oh, so good). You won’t find any salads here (I’m guessing… I’ve never looked, don’t judge me), but what you will find is THE BEST Green Chile Cheeseburger I’ve had in the past few years. And that’s saying something, because I’ve had a lot of them.

Green Chili Bill -- painting that hangs in Burger Boy
Green Chili Bill — the original Burger Boy?

When anyone in the Zia-Roadrunner-Little Coyote clan has a hankering for a REAL green chile cheeseburger (the kind that drips all over the place and has a little heat in the chile) with a side of some kind of deep-fried thing (tots, fries, onion rings), we head down to Burger Boy to get our grub on. Our most commonly-ordered food is the green chile cheeseburger, natch, with tots or fries. Because this is ALWAYS WONDERFUL and this is just what we eat here in New Mexico. I recommend ordering this burger with everything on it except pickles. Pickles and green chile just don’t quite work together.

This is not a fancy burger. It’s not kobe beef, it’s not spritzed with truffle oil, and it doesn’t come stacked 8″ high with a steak knife stabbed down the middle of it to hold it all together. It’s just a burger. THANK YOU, BURGER BOY.

Burger Boy GCCB with Tots
Green Chile Cheeseburger with Tater Tots — how could you not order this?!

This one time, I got it without cheese. It was still awesome. The onion rings are a little on the thin side for me (not much onion) but they were still crispy and tasty.

Burger Boy - Green Chile Hamburger with Onion Rings
Burger Boy – Green Chile Hamburger with Onion Rings

LOOK AT MY GREEN CHILE!

Green Chile Hamburger
Green Chile Hamburger — just, yes. Go eat at Burger Boy already.

OK, if you can bring yourself to branch out from the GCCB family of products, your next step should be the taco plate. This is your standard taco plate, but it is SO GOOD. The tacos are crispy, the ground beef is juicy and flavorful, and these babies go down really easily. Like you could eat 6 of them, that kind of easily.

Burger Boy Taco Plate
Taco Bout Perfection — Taco Plate at Burger Boy

I had to wait for the weather to cool down a tad before I ordered the Frito Chile Pie. It seems like a cold-weather food. So when the temps dipped below 80 (ha), I headed straight over there and ordered it. This starts out like your standard Frito pie, but where traditionally you would have chili (with an I — the red stuff with meat and beans and spices), here you have chile (with an E — the New Mexico stuff with red chile peppers and awesomeness). The chile was flavorful and spicy (just this side of too spicy). There were ample corn chips and plenty of iceberg lettuce and tomatoes on top. There was also a heaping scoop of ground beef and lots of melty cheddar cheese. It was just… wonderful. If you can tear yourself away from the GCCB, this is a great option to try.

Burger Boy - Frito Chile Pie
Frito Chile (with an E) Pie at Burger Boy. With all that lettuce you can pretend it’s a salad!

Everything we have tried here at Burger Boy has been fantastic. That’s why anytime feel we have somehow “earned it,” we head on over to Burger Boy and chow down on some of the best Green Chile Cheeseburgers this side of the Owl Café (and that side of it, too … all sides).